Joint Effort of Rheum Patients Will Outshine Progressing RA

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peeking bearTonight I heard one of the countless diabetes ads. “Are you still using a violent syringe? Buy our flexpen syringe…” Huh? They said it again, only this time I realized it was “vial and syringe.” Funny how we can hear things in a certain way – like the word progress, which can be pronounced two ways.

A progressive rheum disease

I’m always curious about patterns in the ways that RA progresses because the last few years, I’ve only seen my RA get progressively worse. In fact RA can progress in diverse patterns or at different rates, but one thing is almost always certain: RA does progress. It’s called a progressive disease.

When we grasp that, it gives us a sense of urgency. We need to fight to discover ways to make small changes in the care of RA as well as searching for a full-fledged cure.

Rheum relief and other areas of progress

I’ve often found myself encouraging people, “You deserve relief.” I never thought about it, but it comes up repeatedly. We live with so much pain and destruction with a disease we know doesn’t currently have a cure. We can become able to tolerate circumstances that are intolerable. As people with RA, we are resilient and develop extraordinary endurance.

Last week, to honor of the blog’s 2nd birthday, I decided to consider some issues that have been noticeably significant over the last two years. We started with RA swelling. Soon, I’ll post a couple of more frying pan posts on topics like testing, exercise, and goals of rheum care. Where do we stand? And what do we need?

Over the next year, I hope we can encourage each other to press forward, find relief, and improve rheum care. Hopefully, we will see innovation and progress.

Notice the confidence of the NRAS (National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society, UK) in their video.  They describe some ideals that are not the way things usually work in rheumatology… YET! But, in another post last week, we saw Positive Signs that patients will progress as their views are considered by physicians and researchers.

Jointly, progress may be slow, but sure

Painful shoulders and hands have slowed down my work so that I’m even more behind than usual. Our holiday weekend was spent trying to extricate a virus from my laptop and restore the corrupted programs. Even in discouraging circumstances, the outpouring of reassurance and help I’ve received further strengthens my conviction that together we will make progress against RA.

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Kelly Young. All rights reserved.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 at 6:00 am and is filed under RA Education. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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