Laughter as a Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis | Rheumatoid Arthritis Warrior

Laughter as a Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Laughter as an RA treatment

🙂  Laughter may not be a Rheumatoid Arthritis cure, but it seems like humor can help us as much as vitamins do thanks to endorphins.  Laugh yourself silly with this true story about a church, a fish, and Rheumatoid Arthritis. We had so much fun making this picture.

🙂 My son really had no appreciation of my attempts to laugh at chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis. Disease is a serious matter, I know. But you can learn to laugh in almost any situation, even if you have to cry first. This post is about how my son learned that it’s okay to laugh at RA.

🙂 Another time, my son lost a tooth and we imagined that the RA fairy comes like the tooth fairy in the middle of the night. It’s a silly way to look at a serious truth about Rheumatoid Arthritis. Pain and disability can bring so many changes that eventually bring a discussion about how much the disease defines you.

🙂 One day, I let myself do one of those online quizzes about Rheumatoid Arthritis. The goal was to help me see whether my RA is “under control.” I failed the quiz miserably, but it was good for a laugh.

🙂 One of my mom’s alpacas plays the part of a push-me-pull-you in a Dr. Dolittle story that’s a little different. We wonder why some doctors seem to “do very little” for RA.

I hope at least one of these will bring you a laugh. Rereading them this morning made me smile. I need as much help as I can get, so bring on the endorphins, the most natural treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis pain.

Kelly O'Neill Young

Kelly O'Neill (formerly Kelly Young) has worked over 10 years as an advocate helping patients to be better informed and have a greater voice in their healthcare. She is the author of the best-selling book Rheumatoid Arthritis Unmasked: 10 Dangers of Rheumatoid Disease. Kelly received national acknowledgement with the 2011 WebMD Health Hero award. She is the president of the Rheumatoid Patient Foundation. Through her writing and speaking, she builds a more accurate awareness of rheumatoid disease (RD) aka rheumatoid arthritis (RA) geared toward the public and medical community; creates ways to empower patients to advocate for improved diagnosis and treatment; and brings recognition and visibility to the RA patient journey. In addition to RA Warrior, she writes periodically for newsletters, magazines, and websites. There are over 60,000 connections of her highly interactive Facebook page. You can also connect with Kelly by on Twitter or YouTube, or LinkedIn. She created the hashtag: #rheum. Kelly is a mother of five, longtime home-schooler, NASA enthusiast, and NFL fan. She has lived over thirteen years with unrelenting RD. See also https:/rawarrior.com/kelly-young-press/

14 thoughts on “Laughter as a Treatment for Rheumatoid Arthritis

  • December 18, 2009 at 12:37 pm
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    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA…..HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! That was fun!

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  • December 18, 2009 at 12:39 pm
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    I saw a program on that the other evening! There is actually a “laugh” doctor!!

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  • December 18, 2009 at 12:40 pm
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    So very true!! I try to find the joy and humor in most anything. Some people think I’m nuts, but its sure a lot better than crying over something I can’t change. And for those few seconds of laughter, the pain is forgotten….. 🙂

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  • December 18, 2009 at 2:24 pm
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    I make jokes about my RA, my aches, pains and swelling, what I can do and can’t. It not only helps me, but it helps the people around me actually want to know more about it and understand better. It also helps to get rid of the “pity” look I sometimes get, which I don’t like. My sense of humor is my sanity in all this, even if I do seem like a head case at times.

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  • December 18, 2009 at 4:51 pm
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    People who have occasional aches and pains will say “I don’t know how you do it” … I just smile and say “The good news for you is that you pain will go away” … and then I make some crude joke about my RA … makes people think if nothing else!!

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  • December 18, 2009 at 8:40 pm
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    It’s either laugh or cry. I choose laugh.

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    • December 19, 2009 at 11:50 pm
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      I think laughter is truly the best medicine!!!! Laughter and a positive, happy attitude rocks!!!! Pain sucks, but fun and laughter does not!!!!

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  • December 20, 2009 at 2:18 pm
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    I laugh at myself every day and quite often make fun of myself at work. One girl I work with looked horrified last week and told me I was sick. lol It’s pretty bad when you can’t even make fun of yourself without offending someone.

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    • December 20, 2009 at 2:35 pm
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      Maybe it scares her??
      My kids don’t like it all the time either. I think it’s just hard for them to see me so bad off. Sometimes, I say, “If you had RA, you might think this was funnier.” I feel like I have to laugh to make sure I don’t cry.

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  • December 21, 2009 at 4:14 am
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    Happy Holidays People and God Bless US Everyone and in the New Year may all of us begin to heal~

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  • January 24, 2010 at 10:02 am
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    Laughing has been a big help in a world where many think that if they don’t see a problem, it isn’t there. I have a life partner now who is indeed an optimist as well as a songwriter and musician. He sings me funny ditties and whenever he sees me down or in pain, finds something hilariously funny to make me laugh. We recently saw The Hangover and OMG I was laughing so hard I almost fell off the sofa! Indeed, laughter and endorphins, are awesome! :musicnote:

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  • January 30, 2010 at 7:51 am
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    without laughter in each and every day,,,,,i’d go insane with this THING we are dealing with

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  • April 4, 2013 at 3:00 pm
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    As I lay on a surgical cart in the pre-op room at the Mayo Clinic, both legs stretched hanging from stirrups as two of my Surgeons best looking Residents massages my feet and knees with sponges soaked in some horribly strong yet kindly scented surgical wash (pre bi-lateral knee replacement surgery) my Surgeon walked in a half hour late to greet me.
    I could not help myself as he asked how I was feeling.
    I lifted my head and spoke: Could we get on with this? I’ve got a hot date in an hour!
    After surgery the surgical ward staff had been warned to keep an eye on me in case I tried to sneak out on m hot date. I had the entire ward laughing!

    Reply

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